banner

Publications: Fact Sheets and More

Research Protocols

May 4, 2012 • Posted in Fact Sheets and More

1. Virology. 2006 Mar 15;346(2):394-401.

Chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine protects against Zaire Ebola virus.Kobinger GP, Feldmann H, Zhi Y, Schumer G, Gao G, Feldmann F, Jones S, Wilson JM.

Special Pathogens Program, National Microbiology Laboratory, Health Canada, Canadian Science Centre for Human and Animal Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.

Abstract:
This study evaluated the use of a chimpanzee-based adenovirus vaccine in mouse and Guinea pigs models of Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV) infection. Vaccine vector expressing the envelope glycoprotein of ZEBOV was created from the molecular clone of chimpanzee adenovirus pan7 (AdC7). AdC7 vaccine stimulated robust T and B cell responses to ZEBOV in naïve mice inducing complete protection to an otherwise lethal challenge of ZEBOV. Complete protection to Zaire Ebola virus was also observed in Guinea pigs vaccinated with a relatively low dose of AdC7 (5 x 10(9)/kg). Pre-existing immunity to AdHu5 was generated in mice following pre-exposure to AdHu5 or administration of pooled human immune globulin. Pre-existing immunity to human adenoviruses severely compromised the efficacy of the human AdHu5 vaccine but not the chimpanzee AdC7 vaccine. These results validate further development of Chimpanzee-based vaccine and highlight the impact of pre-existing immunity to the vaccine carrier.

2. Vaccine. 2007 Jul 9;25(28):5220-31.

Adenovirus-based vaccine prevents pneumonia in ferrets challenged with the SARS coronavirus and stimulates robust immune responses in macaques.

Kobinger GP, Figueredo JM, Rowe T, Zhi Y, Gao G, Sanmiguel JC, Bell P, Wivel NA, Zitzow LA, Flieder DB, Hogan RJ, Wilson JM.
Special Pathogens Program, National Microbiology Laboratory, Health Canada, Canadian Science Centre for Human and Animal Health, Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.

Abstract:
A ferret model of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV infection was used to evaluate the efficacy of an adenovirus vaccine. Animals were subjected to heterologous prime-boost using vectors from human serotype 5 and chimpanzee derived adenoviruses (human AdHu5 and chimpanzee AdC7) expressing spike protein followed by intranasal challenge with SARS-CoV. Vaccination led to a substantial reduction in viral load and prevented the severe pneumonia seen in unvaccinated animals. The same prime-boost strategy was effective in rhesus macaques in eliciting SARS-CoV specific immune responses. These data indicate that a heterologous adenovirus-based prime-boost vaccine strategy could safely stimulate strong immunity that may be needed for complete protection against SARS-CoV infection.


 

Top Δ