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Publications: Fact Sheets and More

HIV: A Summary of NIH-Funded Research

April 7, 2012 • Posted in Fact Sheets and More

The amount of federal dollars funding protocols on HIV/AIDS research using chimpanzees has declined to the point of nearly non-existence in comparison with other areas of HIV/AIDS research. 

The 2008 research protocols listed below primarily involve the use of biological samples from chimpanzees (i.e. cells, tissues, blood, and/or serum) versus using chimpanzees as a complete model for HIV; to our knowledge, neither the Wistar Institute nor the universities listed house chimpanzees onsite. The chimpanzee samples used are likely obtained through a cooperative arrangement with a facility housing chimpanzees.

Researcher: ERTL, HILDEGUND C. J.
Grant No. 5U19AI074078-02
Project: HIV-1 Vaccine Based on Chimp Serotypes of Adenovirus
Institution: WISTAR INSTITUTE
Project runs: Sept. 1, 2007 – Aug. 31, 2012
Funding: $5,630,858 ($2,861,413 for 2008)

 

Researcher: BIBOLLET-RUCHE, FREDERIC
Grant No. 1R21AI080364-01
Project: The Role of Matrix Cofactors in SIVcpz Replication
Institution: UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA AT BIRMINGHAM
Project runs: Sept. 24, 2008 – Aug. 31, 2010
Funding: $206,250

 

Researcher: HAHN, BEATRICE H
Grant No. 2R37AI050529-06A1
Project: Natural SIV Reservoirs and Human Zoonotic Risk
Institution: UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA AT BIRMINGHAM
Project runs: Aug. 1, 2008 – Jan. 31, 2013
Funding: $943,200  ($481,289 for 2008)

 

Researcher: ZHAO, RICHARD YUQI
Grant No. 1R21NS063880-01
Project: Fission Yeast as a HTS Platform for New Molecular Probes of HIV-1 VPR-Medicated A
Institution: UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE
Project runs: June 15, 2008 – May 31, 2009
Funding: $150,000

 

Researcher: MURTHY, KRISHNA
Grant No. 2P51RR013986-060186
Project: HIV-1 Adenovirus-Based Vaccine Study in Chimpanzees
Institution: Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, San Antonio
Project runs: May 1, 2004 - April 30, 2005
Funding: $6,004,828 * for 2P51RR013986-06

No abstract was available for the 2005 grant above. The following excerpt was taken from a paper published by Krishna Murthy, Harvey Alter and others:

“…chimpanzee (X034) was inoculated with 38 median tissue culture infective doses of HIV-1 IIIB; serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained one to two times per week for 12 weeks and then biweekly for 12 weeks. … RESULTS: No HIV markers were noted until 5 weeks after inoculation, at which time virus was isolated and HIV RNA and DNA were detected in plasma and cells, respectively. … Plasma and cells obtained from Chimpanzee X034 3 or 4 weeks after exposure were then sequentially inoculated into a second chimpanzee (X176); no HIV infection was observed in this animal during serial follow-up for 24 weeks after each inoculation. In contrast, when the fifth-week HIV-1 RNA- and DNA-positive sample was inoculated, Chimpanzee X176 was unequivocally infected with HIV-1.” (1)

* This research study is part of a larger project and the amount indicated is for the entire project, not this single grant.

 


Sources

Grant information is from the NIH Computer Retrieval of Information on Scientific Projects (CRISP) database and funding amounts are obtained from the Department of Health and Human Services’ Tracking Accountability in Government Grants System (TAGGS).

(1) Murthy KK, Henrard DR, Eichberg JW, Cobb KE, Busch MP, Allain JP, Alter HJ. Redefining the HIV-infectious window period in the chimpanzee model: evidence to suggest that viral nucleic acid testing can prevent blood-borne transmission. Transfusion. 1999 Jul;39(7):688-93.

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